PART 2: PODCAST- Does The Evangelical View of the Cross Lead To Violence?

Part 2 of a conversation between Quoir authors Keith Giles, Jamal Jivanjee and Matthew Distefano about how Evangelical Christian views of the crucifixion relate to ideas about redemptive violence, and more. LISTEN TO PART 1 HERE NOTE: I personally do not believe that the Penal Substitutionary Atonement Theory is what ultimately leads to violence. Case in point: The early Christians did not embrace this PSA theory until John Calvin introduced it in the 1500s, and yet they did engage in a lot of violence against others, and even one another. However: The PSA view does impact the way we see…

Continue reading

Guest Post: Episode 47: Why The Evangelical Message About The Cross Leads To Violence: An Interview With Quoir Authors Keith Giles & Matthew Distefano

jamal jivanj, matthew distefano

Although Jesus was the prince of peace and demonstrated love and non-violence throughout his life, evangelical Christians by and large have been the most consistent defenders of empire building, military action, and war. The reason for this anomaly among Christian behavior isn’t simply hypocrisy, however. This behavior could very well be rooted in the way we have been taught to see the cross and the nature of divine justice. Because humans are reflective beings, people will always reflect the God they perceive.

I recently sat down with fellow Quoir authors Matthew Distefano & Keith Giles to record a podcast about how the Penal Substitution Atonement theory (held by evangelicalism) actually produces violence.

At the 6:15 mark, we discuss the disconnect that penal substitution theory causes between our view of God as father, and our view of Jesus.

At the 10:00 mark, we discuss the fallacy of believing that sin separates us from God.

At the 14:30 mark, we discuss why Jesus actually was crucified.

At the 20:54 mark, we discuss why Penal Substitution Theory of the cross was not a view held by early Christians.  Penal Substitution Theory, as commonly found in modern evangelical thinking, was largely a creation of John Calvin.

The resources mentioned in this conversation were:

Desire Found Me

Stricken By God

Saved From Sacrifice

The Monster God debates

The Gospel in Chairs

From The Blood of Able

If you haven’t subscribed to The Love Cast yet, would you consider doing that? Here is the link on iTunes where you can listen to this episode, subscribe, and write a review as well:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-love-cast-with-jamal/id1126696772

or you can listen directly here:

http://thelovecast.libsyn.com/episode-47-why-the-evangelical-message-about-the-cross-actually-leads-to-violence-an-interview-with-quoir-authors-keith-giles-matthew-distefano

Source: Jamal Jivanjee https://www.jamaljivanjee.com

Modern Evangelicalism as Second Temple Judaism v. 2.0

I grew up in the Evangelical church, so I’m fairly familiar with all of the standard doctrines: Pre-tribulation rapture, eternal conscious torment, penal substitution atonement, retributive eschatology, yada yada yada. What I never realized during my time in these staunchly conservative fundamentalist churches, however, is that the gist of what was taught is the same as what was taught by many of Jesus’ rivals—i.e. the Pharisees, Sadducees, and Essenes. In this article, we will discuss three of the more prominent shared doctrines. SIMILARITY I: HERMENEUTICS: “WHAT ABOUT THIS VERSE? WHAT ABOUT THAT VERSE?” When we listen to most Evangelicals, the…

Continue reading

Book Feature Sunday: A Journey with Two Mystics – Conversations Between a Girardian and a Wattsian by Matthew Distefano and Michael Machuga

The best theology is that which enfolds us and assures us that we are immersed in unconditional Love. The best friendships do exactly the same thing. A Journey with Two Mystics is a testimony to the God who so loves us as to create us from love and in love for relationship with God and each other. It is a correspondence not only between two mystics, but two best friends. Matthew Distefano and Michael Machuga write with honesty, warmth, humor and thoughtfulness, drawing readers not only into the exploration of their questions and answers, but into the experience of their…

Continue reading